5 Ways to Help Deal With Pet Obesity

A chubby ginger cat.

We know that pudgy puppies and tubby tabbies look extra cute and cuddly, but the fact is, those extra LBs are impacting more than your pet’s dress size. A little extra weight can put your pet at an increased risk of serious health conditions. And while she might not seem self-conscious about those extra pounds, you can bet the added heft is affecting her energy levels and mobility. 

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The Keys to Successful Leash Training

A black and white dog on a leash.

Owners new to dog ownership are often surprised when their pup has no respect for the leash. The chewing, resisting, barking, yanking, stopping, and jumping can turn the simple joy of walking together upside down. There could be various reasons they have trouble walking on leash, and none are their fault. We’ll help you get to the bottom of their questionable walking skills with our tried and true tips for successful leash training. 

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You Can Leash Train Your Cat, but Should You?

Cat on a leash.

Cats are incredibly intelligent, but beyond properly using their litter box, we do not expect a whole lot from them. Why is that? Is it because cats universally give off a vibe that they’re “above” being trained? They are undoubtedly capable of being trained, but perhaps it’s the way they’re approached that matters most. If you’ve ever wondered if you could (or should) leash train your cat, this could be the moment you’ve been waiting for.

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Is There Such a Thing as Dogs Being Too Treat Motivated?

A black and white dog focuses on a treat in front of his nose.
“Come to papa.”

Most dogs live to eat. A healthy interest in food is not a bad thing, however,  and a dog who likes to eat makes it easier to select a good food since they are less likely to have strong preferences. 

The diets of many dogs include both treats and kibble. While being treat-motivated can often make training a breeze, too much of a good thing can certainly exist. So what is a pet owner to do when a pet is just too treat motivated? Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital has your answers. 

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No Couch Potatoes: Encouraging Safe Pet Activity After Surgery

Post-surgical care is important when it comes to proper healing and health. Healing can be a long process, and providing proper pain relief and nutrition can help tremendously.

While your pet patient is likely to have activity restrictions post procedure, Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital knows that post-op exercise has value. Encouraging safe pet activity after surgery can aid in recovery in a big way.

Knowing the Limits

Of course every pet and every surgical procedure are different. It is important to understand any post-surgical restrictions your pet has,  so that you can be sure exercise and activity is performed safely. 

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Safe Exercise and Play for Your Pet After Surgery

After a surgery, your pet will be required to rest for a set period of time. In more complex surgeries, they may need to be crated to avoid movement. But eventually, your pet will need limited forms of exercise and activities to keep them healthy, encourage better recovery, and make them happy.

The team at Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital wants to give our pet owners some insight into how to safely exercise your pet after surgery. Movement is important to their healing and well-being, which is why understanding the right way to exercise and play post-surgery is so important.

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The Nutty Mutt: Dogs and Nuts

Most of us know that peanuts and other nuts are something that we need to be careful with around our fellow humans, but what about dogs? Are things like peanut butter safe for your pet? What precautions should you take if giving your pet nut products? 

Dogs and nuts can make a great partnership, but at Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital we want you to know how to pamper your pooch safely.

The Thing About Dogs and Nuts

Nuts can make a terrific and tasty treat for your pet. The majority of nuts are safe for pets and nut allergies are uncommon.

There are a few exceptions, however, such as macadamia nuts, which can result in vomiting, fever, tremors, high heart rates, and incoordination when consumed in large quantities. Less common nuts such as English walnuts, ginkgo nuts, and horse chestnuts should also be avoided.

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Our Two Favorite Things: Pizza and Pets

Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital is pretty sure that when it comes to the most enjoyable things in life, pizza and pets top the list. But do they go together? We would like to think so, but there are some things to take into consideration.

Anatomy of a Pizza

Baked dough, cheese, and delicious toppings  – what could be better than pizza? Our pets most likely agree, but pizza is not necessarily totally benign when it comes to our animal friends. 

When it comes to pizza and pets there are definitely some things to think about.

Breaking it down into its mouthwatering little parts, consider:

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Is There a Link Between Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease?

Conscientious pet parents are always on the lookout for ways to enhance the lives of their pets. We vow to take them on more walks, buy them the latest Furbo, and make sure to schedule a wellness exam every year. But what about the food we give them?  

Research shows that feeding your pet a high-quality diet is linked to better health outcomes and a longer lifespan. However, some diets are causing concern among veterinary specialists. In fact, earlier this summer, the FDA issued a cautionary statement that grain free diets may be linked to the development of a condition in dogs called dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, as of this fall, veterinary experts are linking the problem instead to boutique, exotic, or grain free diets. Stay tuned as we explore the possible link between grain free diets and heart disease.

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We Talk Turkey: Thanksgiving Fun for Pets

Thanksgiving fun for pets isn't all about food and pet safety.

Thanksgiving is right around the corner, and you may be thinking about meals, family, and eating your fill of delicious foods. It’s natural to want to share in the fun with our furry family members too, but the holiday table is fraught with high fat, salty foods that are not the best for our pets.

Feeding our pets traditional Thanksgiving foods like turkey bones, table scraps, gravy, and stuffing can cause GI upset – and worse. Any sudden change in diet and consuming fatty foods can cause a painful and potentially deadly condition called pancreatitis.

With that in mind, we decided to put together a list of ideas for Thanksgiving fun for pets – that don’t include food. After all, a healthy pet is one of the best things to be thankful for!

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