Special Care for Senior Cats: How to Provide Some Extra TLC For Your Senior Cat

It used to be that an eight year old cat was considered a senior. But with better nutrition, indoor living, and preventive health care, cats are now regularly living into their teens and twenties. Making that time together the best it can be is one of our most important goals at Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital.

Senior cats do tend to be less active and playful, have a harder time getting to their favorite places, and may lose weight. Don’t chalk up behavior or health changes to old age, however. Getting older is not a disease, and physical changes can be often be attributed to health problems and/or dental problems that we can address and treat.

Aging in Cats

Because aging changes happen gradually – without you even noticing them, perhaps – we recommend seeing your older cat twice per year so that we can catch small problems and treat them before they become advanced. Cats are masters at hiding signs of disease, so the quicker we catch these problems, the better your cat can feel.

Special Care for Senior Cats

In addition to routine preventive care exams, there are some simple things you can do to help your cat enjoy her golden years.

Some like it warm – cats like warm places, so make sure your senior cat has a bed or other comfortable resting spots in a warm part of your house. They may have more trouble moving away from discomfort, however, so think warm, not hot.

Easy access – senior cats may have trouble getting to food, water, and their litter box if these places are accessed by stairs, high on perches, or even behind a baby gate or a cat door. Arthritis may play a role as well. Pay attention to any eating, drinking, or litter box changes and assess whether difficulty getting there is having an impact.

It’s a good idea to have a litter box on each floor of your home for easy access, since older felines may also have reduced control over bowels and bladder.

Help her get there – senior cats love their special places but may have trouble getting up to a favorite window sill or perch. You can create box steps or a ramp for cats who can no longer jump up to their special spot. Make sure footing is secure and non-slip.

Gentle grooming – senior cats can benefit from a little help from you in the grooming department. Use a soft brush to remove loose hairs and stimulate circulation. Plus, it just feels good for your cat, and improves your bond. Keep in mind that a sudden lack of grooming may signal a health problem.

Play – although getting a rambunctious kitten for your older cat is not recommended, keep your senior playful with a feather wand, playing “fetch” with dry kibble, or mixing up crinkle mice toys with other novel toys.

Night light – older cats may have waning vision, so you can install a night light for her to help her get her bearings at night. If your cat is blind, try to keep her surroundings consistent (by not moving furniture).

Attention to the basics – good nutrition is important for cats at any stage of life. But senior cats can benefit from a little attention to this necessity. A high quality diet has been shown to improve health and longevity, so talk to us about the best fit for your cat.

Creatures of routine – just like older people, older cats can derive comfort from their normal daily routine. Senior cats may become more dependent on relationships, so make sure to carve out some time every day to spend quality time with her.

As our cats age, they can definitely benefit from a little extra TLC. Special cats (and they are all special, in our book!) deserve special senior care. If you have any questions or need assistance with any of the ideas above, please don’t hesitate to call us. We’re here to help you make your cat’s golden years the best they can be!

Corn Chip Feet: Why do My Dog’s Feet Smell Like Fritos?

Why Do Dog’s Feet Smell Like Fritos?

If you’re like us, corn chips are one of your favorite snacks. But have you ever noticed that your dog’s feet smell like Fritos? Many people report they actually like this smell! Regardless of how you feel about this phenomenon, it’s pretty common, and you may be wondering what’s behind this peculiar occurrence.

Whether you think your pet’s feet smell like corn chips, popcorn, or other corn-related snacks, stay tuned as Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital explores the world of doggy Frito feet!

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Is There a Link Between Grain Free Diets and Heart Disease?

Conscientious pet parents are always on the lookout for ways to enhance the lives of their pets. We vow to take them on more walks, buy them the latest Furbo, and make sure to schedule a wellness exam every year. But what about the food we give them?  

Research shows that feeding your pet a high-quality diet is linked to better health outcomes and a longer lifespan. However, some diets are causing concern among veterinary specialists. In fact, earlier this summer, the FDA issued a cautionary statement that grain free diets may be linked to the development of a condition in dogs called dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, as of this fall, veterinary experts are linking the problem instead to boutique, exotic, or grain free diets. Stay tuned as we explore the possible link between grain free diets and heart disease.

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Furry Personal Barometers: The Truth About Cat Tails

Cat tails are trying to tell you something.


People depend on verbal communication to understand each other, but body language is a huge part of eye-to-eye conversations. Even though we constantly process and synthesize information from others, confusion and miscommunications occur all the time. So, if we aren’t that great at understanding other humans, how can we expect to learn verbal and nonverbal cues from a whole separate species?

Felines, for example, use various vocalizations to communicate, but amazingly, cat tails are equally helpful indicators.

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