Why Are My Dog’s Eyes Red? Eye Redness in Dogs

Eye redness in dogs is easy to spot. You may notice redness around the eye, along with swelling, discharge, pawing at the eye, squinting, or repeated blinking. Eye redness can be caused by an injury, irritation, or even a disease.

Regardless of the cause, the condition can be uncomfortable and even painful for your pet, so a veterinary visit is in order right away. 

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Fun Cat Facts

Ah, cats! They are fun, playful, loving, and fiercely independent. And, they often confuse us with their antics and behavior. Whatever the personality of your cat, there’s no denying they are endlessly fascinating.

Maybe that’s why at Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital, we never tire of hearing fun cat facts, and we have a feeling you don’t either! 

Physical Prowess

The physical abilities of cats is nothing short of incredible. Did you know that:

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Fun Dog Facts

We may be biased, but at Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital, we think dogs are amazingly cool. That may be why we’re so interested in learning more about them. From details about their mental and physical capabilities, to interesting facts about their behavior and tendencies, we are constantly entertained and wowed by fun dog facts. 

Keep reading as we share some of what we’ve learned about dogs over the years!

Why Do They Do That?

There are so many fascinating dog behaviors that it was difficult to select just a few. Here are our favorites:

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Feline Diseases: Should You Be Worried About FIV and FeLV?

There are core and non-core vaccinations available for cats, and your veterinarian can help you to determine the best course of action for your pet.

Non-core vaccinations, such as those for feline leukemia (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are typically recommended based on lifestyle. If your cat is regularly exposed to the outdoors, these vaccines are worth considering.

What Is FIV?

Feline immunodeficiency virus affects the body’s ability to normally respond to an immune response. Similar to the way HIV can lead to AIDS in humans, an FIV-positive cat has specific challenges related to the immune system. Typically transmitted through bite wounds sustained in cat fights, proactive, effective treatment can help a cat live comfortably with FIV for some time.

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Senior Pet Celebration: How To Take Great Care of Your Senior Pet

When you have a senior pet, one of the most important things to remember is this: dying isn’t optional, but suffering can be. In other words, older pets can still enjoy life, be active and pain free, and stay healthy for weeks, months, or even years to come. And your veterinarian can help make this happen.

Working with us in the golden years of a pet’s life can make that precious time happy and healthy for both of you. 

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Ear Mites and Other Things You May Find in Pet Ears

Cleaning your pet’s ears periodically is a part of good pet hygiene and is also a great way to be sure that you are picking up on problems as quickly as possible.

When performing this maintenance task, you may run across a few things you need to know more about. Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital wants you to know what to do with what you might find in pet ears. 

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Tough Pill to Swallow? Pill Pockets (and Other Schemes) To Change the Game

If you’ve ever watched a vet or tech administer medication, it can look remarkably easy. That is, of course, until you try it at home. The animal in need of a pill seems to have found a new hiding spot, or catches a whiff of the “yucky stuff” and protests with clenched jaws. You might be able to fool them by mixing their medication in with their food or, better yet, a special treat, but their cleverness always prevails. Half-eaten dishes or discarded treats may reveal that they managed to eat around the pill. 

Fortunately, pill pockets and other trickery offer great solutions to getting a picky pet to take their medicine. 

Miss a Dose?

When animals miss doses of necessary medication designed to heal or safeguard health, progress can be upended, or they can be exposed to certain health complications. It’s important that they consistently receive the right dose at the correct time. 

Saving Time and Money

Ensuring that your pet receives their timely medication reduces the negative impact of missed doses on their overall health – and your wallet. Administering medication at home doesn’t have to be fraught with confusion, frustration, or unfortunate results. 

Pill Pockets

Animals are highly food-motivated. As long as you are able to successfully mask the look and smell of medicine, most pets will happily gobble up whatever you’re trying to give them. And if peanut butter gobs or chicken meat bundles aren’t their jam, look no further than the ingeniousness of modern-day pill pockets.

Disguised Dosages

Masking the scent of unsavory, bitter, or bland medication is as easy as inserting a pill into a pocket of tasty goodness. Greenies Pill Pockets are always a safe bet. Simply squeeze the treat around a pill and watch the magic go down! 

Other Cheats

Sure, some pets don’t think twice about eating garbage or feces, but try to give them a pill and they turn up their nose. 

  • Show them a pill in one hand. 
  • Let them sniff it. 
  • Cover up another pill in a squished up gob of grated cheddar or unsweetened peanut butter. 
  • Give them a choice to either eat the pill straight, or the delicious treat that happens to be medication in disguise. 

You can try grinding up the pills into a powder and sprinkling it on their food, but make sure to check with your veterinarian first. This method can have mixed results (and it’s crucial they get their full dose every time).

Watch and Learn

If pill pockets don’t work, and they aren’t taking the bait on any other treats, use a pill dispenser or gently use your own hands:

  • Place the pill between your thumb and forefinger.
  • Gently pull back on your pet’s head to straighten out their neck.
  • Open their mouth and carefully drop the pill at the back of the throat (where the back of the tongue meets the palate).
  • Sweetly rub the throat in a downwards motion to help the pill go down.

Please let your Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital team know if you need help with pill pockets or other methods for safe, successful medication administration. Some prescriptions can be given trans-dermally or in compounds from special pharmacies.
The relationship between you and your pet will stay strong when you give them great alternatives for taking medicine or supplements they need. Good luck!

Sneezing, Wheezing, and Honking: Respiratory Noises in Pets

Most pets sneeze, wheeze, cough, or make other respiratory sounds at some point or another. Sometimes it is no big deal, but other times respiratory noises in pets are cause for alarm. Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital thinks it’s important for pet owners to know what’s normal, and when to worry.

Decoding Respiratory Noises in Pets

If you rushed your pet in for every grunt, snort, or sniffle, you might be in to see us quite often! While we don’t mind seeing your pet, there are lots of different reasons respiratory noises in pets happen, and some are perfectly normal.

Some of the more common causes of respiratory sounds in pets include:

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The Ick Factor: Why Do Dogs Eat Poop (And Other Gross Things)

Have you ever been the recipient of a big wet dog kiss and simultaneously realized your dog just ate cat poop (or worse)? We can’t believe they do it, and don’t understand why. But one thing’s for sure, some dogs sure seem to enjoy it – even with our loud protests.

It turns out this disgusting habit is just another result of natural dog behavior. At Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital, we explore this phenomenon and what pet owners can do about it.

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Vaccinations and Preventives for Indoor Pets: Are They Really Necessary?

“Why does my pet need vaccines and flea prevention if she never goes outside?” This is a common question that indoor pet owners ask their veterinarian. And although it may seem as if monthly preventives for fleas, ticks, and heartworm as well as keeping vaccines current are a waste of money, the reality is that being indoors does not eliminate the risk of infectious disease or other parasite related problems for indoor pets.

Year round parasite control and a vaccination program are integral parts of your indoor pet’s health care plan. And because some parasites and infectious diseases are transmissible to humans, Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital is certain that keeping your pet protected also protects your family.

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