Snake Bites: Don’t Wait, This Is a Real Pet Emergency

Snakes are as ubiquitous in Texas as country music and BBQ. Luckily, of the four types of venomous snakes found here, the coral snake, copperhead, rattlesnake, and cottonmouth (also known as the water moccasin), are rarely aggressive without provocation.

Through an understanding of snake habitat and behavior, pet owners can help their best friends avoid a painful, and potentially life-threatening, pet emergency.

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How in the World Are You Supposed to Keep Your Pets Safe From Snakes?

Of the 250 snake species in the United States, only four of them are venomous. Unfortunately, all four species – the copperhead, coral, rattle, and cottonmouth – can be found here in Texas. 

Most of us are well-versed in the art of snake avoidance, but lots of pets aren’t always familiar with typical snake habitats. Indeed, many dogs and cats are drawn to the same spot that snakes seem to frequent. Fortunately, there are some great strategies to keep pets safe from snakes. 

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Dog Leashes that are Safer than Retractable Ones

Of all the gear needed for responsible dog ownership, a good leash ranks pretty high. Of course, dog leashes vary in size, length, material, and the many ways they keep dogs and people safe.

For some, retractable leashes offer the perfect combination of freedom and flexibility. However, because they present serious injury risks, retractable leashes aren’t the best choice. So, what are the best dog leashes out there?

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Why Dogs Dig and What You Can do About it

Dogs can be puzzling and entertaining, but when they do things that seemingly defy human logic and understanding, owners can go from exasperation to anger in no time.

Consider digging, for example. An innocuous canine behavior most of the time, digging can become pretty destructive for some pets. Let’s take a closer look at why dogs dig and some possible solutions to redirect their one-track mind.

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Spring Has Sprung! And With It Comes Spring Pet Toxins

Spring is in the air, and we are all ready to get outside! Even with the mild winters of San Antonio, there’s nothing like the first spring breeze and a little more daylight to get the spring fever started. Our pets feel the pull of the season as well, and are eager to stretch their legs in the sun, too.

But more outdoor time sometimes means that – surprise! – your pet got into something they shouldn’t, and you wind up at the emergency clinic. With our list of spring pet toxins, Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital can help you keep these surprises to a minimum as the weather warms up.

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The Unthinkable: Avoiding a Stolen Pet

We all know that February 14th is Valentine’s Day, but did you know it is also Pet Theft Awareness Day? It is estimated that 2 million pets are stolen each year. This unthinkable tragedy is also a call to awareness for loving pet owners.

Depending on breed, pets can be stolen for fighting, used for breeding, or for their high price tags. In many other cases, they are simply taken home as pets or given as gifts.

Many of these pets never find their rightful homes. Although you may think it’s unlikely as you supervise your pet, there are still many situations that may put a pet at risk. Pet theft can happen anywhere and at any time, and all it takes is a few seconds.

At Leon Valley Veterinary Hospital, we can’t even imagine this happening to our pets, so we want to offer you some tips for how to keep your pets safe, here.

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We Talk Turkey: Thanksgiving Fun for Pets

Thanksgiving fun for pets isn't all about food and pet safety.

Thanksgiving is right around the corner, and you may be thinking about meals, family, and eating your fill of delicious foods. It’s natural to want to share in the fun with our furry family members too, but the holiday table is fraught with high fat, salty foods that are not the best for our pets.

Feeding our pets traditional Thanksgiving foods like turkey bones, table scraps, gravy, and stuffing can cause GI upset – and worse. Any sudden change in diet and consuming fatty foods can cause a painful and potentially deadly condition called pancreatitis.

With that in mind, we decided to put together a list of ideas for Thanksgiving fun for pets – that don’t include food. After all, a healthy pet is one of the best things to be thankful for!

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San Antonio and Beyond: Fall Pet Activities to Swoon Over

San Antonio Fall Activities for Pets Abound

October is arguably one of the best months in southern Texas. The heat finally backs off, and there’s an abundance of things to do outdoors. Indeed, with all the fun to experience in and around San Antonio this fall, it just wouldn’t do to leave your dog at home. Instead, check out these tips to experience the best fall pet activities around town!

Ready for This?

Going out in public with your dog is always fun, but it’s more delightful when they’re well-behaved. Don’t take your pet along if they pose a risk to other animals or people. Also be sure they’re fully vaccinated, microchipped, current on parasite prevention, spayed/neutered, and can understand basic voice commands.

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Tips for Running with Your Dog

Black and white dog on leash with woman jogging

Dogs love to be with us, and they usually have boundless energy. In fact, they could be the perfect exercise partner—as long as you pay attention to some basic do’s and don’ts of running with your dog.

The Do’s of Running with Your Dog

Do check with your veterinarian. Before starting any new exercise program, be sure to bring your dog in for a preventive care exam. It’s important to assess your dog’s fitness level and know how to avoid any joint or muscle injuries. Continue…

When A Good Walk Goes Bad: The Dangers Of Retractable Leashes

Retractable leashes are popular but do have some safety issues that you should be aware of. If you’ve never seen a dog being walked on a retractable leash you might very well be living in a cave or under a rock. These wildly popular leashes aren’t really leashes at all, rather they consist of a cord which is wrapped around a spring loaded device and contained inside a plastic handle. A button on the handle allows the walker to control the amount of leash that extends out, allowing a dog to walk as far or as close as their human chooses.

While this may sound like great fun and freedom for both dog and walker, retractable leashes pose significant risk to the health and safety of both the dog and human who uses it.

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